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Almonds at Breakfast Improve Satiety and Blood Glucose Levels

Almonds

A recent study by Dr. Richard Mattes found that adults with impaired glucose tolerance (or prediabetes) benefited from including almonds at breakfast. The study found that including whole almonds in the breakfast meal (almonds, orange juice and Cream of Wheat) significantly increased satiety and decreased blood glucose concentrations throughout the day compared to the control breakfast meal of orange juice and Cream of Wheat.

The Almond Board of California distributed a press release on this study in July, adding data to a string of studies related to prediabetes and type-2 diabetes published in late 2010 and 2011. Three of these studies were almond specific (Mori and Mattes, Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism; Wien, Journal of the American College of Nutrition; Cohen, Metabolism), and one, funded by The International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research & Education Foundation, was focused on tree nuts. Notably, all of these studies provided data to support the inclusion of almonds or mixed nuts in the diet for those aiming to improve blood glucose concentrations or measures of insulin sensitivity.*

For more information, visit: AlmondBoard.com.

*Scientific evidence suggests, but does not prove, that eating 1.5 ounces per day of most nuts, such as almonds, as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol may reduce the risk of heart disease. One serving of almonds (28g) has 13g of unsaturated fat and only 1g of saturated fat.

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