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Past Issues
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Sustainability
(Issue: April 2014)
The Almond Sustainability Report released at last year’s Almond Conference reveals that nutrient and irrigation management efficiencies have a significant impact on air quality and energy in addition to nutrient management and water quality and supply.
(Issue: March 2014)
The Almond Board of California will be hosting a workshop with Dellavalle Laboratory on Wednesday, Mar. 5, in Fresno to offer growers an opportunity to learn about leaf sampling and irrigation monitoring techniques as well as to participate in the California Almond Sustainability Program (CASP).
(Issue: March 2014)
The California Almond Sustainability Program (CASP) is now entering its sixth year, and information gathered thus far confirms what many in our industry have been saying: Almond growers are excellent stewards of the resources needed to produce their crops.
(Issue: February 2014)
Since 2009, more than 1,000 California Almond growers have participated in the California Almond Sustainability Program (CASP) by attending a grower workshop. At these workshops, hosted throughout the Central Valley, growers come to learn about CASP and voluntarily fill out some self-assessments before eating lunch and getting back out to the ranch.
(Issue: February 2014)
When it comes to California water policy, “the impulse in the state of California has been to throw money at water, hoping or wishing that something miraculous will occur, thus solving our current and future dilemmas related to supply,” said Phil Isenberg in a keynote speech on water policy delivered at The Almond Conference in December.
(Issue: January 2014)
With the new year comes a brand new season for the California Almond Sustainability Program (CASP)! Participating is now easier than ever with the new sustainability website.
(Issue: December 2013)
After four years of almond grower participation in the California Almond Sustainability Program (CASP), the first report is being released at The 2013 Almond Conference.
(Issue: November 2013)
Listen to Almond Board’s Kendall Barton on AgNet/West radio discuss the first California Almond Sustainability Program report.
(Issue: August 2013)
The Almond Board of California (ABC) and SureHarvest, which manages the ABC’s California Almond Sustainability Program, were each honored at the 68th International Conference of the Soil and Water Conservation Society (SWCS) held in Reno in July.
(Issue: June 2013)
June and July are going to be hot, hot, hot! Just like your thermometers, the heat of the California Almond Sustainability Program (CASP) is rising over the next two months with some sizzling public workshops.
(Issue: May 2013)
Come out to Duarte Nursery in Hughson on June 4 to get the latest news on California Almonds.
(Issue: April 2013)
Are you a California Almond grower? If so, Almond Board of California invites you to a California Almond Sustainability Program (CASP) workshop at Hilltop Ranch on April 11.
(Issue: April 2013)
Like many California Almond growers, Eric Genzoli has been able to manage what, at one time, was the most difficult insect pest in almonds: navel orangeworm.
(Issue: March 2013)

If you’ve attended a California Almond Sustainability Program (CASP) workshop before and assessed your growing practices, that’s great, but you’re not done!

(Issue: March 2013)

New research funded by the Almond Board of California Environmental Committee is looking at net energy use and greenhouse gas emissions during the life cycle of almonds from nursery to hulling and shelling.

(Issue: February 2013)

The California Almond Sustainability Program (CASP) season — now in its fifth year — is officially under way for 2013.

(Issue: January 2013)
With the introduction of an online version of the California Almond Sustainability Program (CASP), growers are finding that filling out the information from their home or office computer is faster, easier and more convenient than attending a workshop.
(Issue: December 2012)
Increased participation in the California Almond Sustainability Program (CASP) is yielding statistically significant data that shows the almond industry is practicing sustainability in a range of production practices.
(Issue: December 2012)
The completion of the harvest marks the end of a long period of work for California’s Almond growers and the approach of the holiday season.
(Issue: November 2012)
Complete the online Pest Management self-assessment module for the California Almond Sustainability Program, and receive one continuing education unit from the Department of Pesticide Regulation.
(Issue: September 2012)
The Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) Annual Meeting and Food Expo, which brings together more than 30,000 global food science professionals, took place July 25-28 in Las Vegas.
(Issue: August 2012)
The Almond Board’s Environmental Stewardship Tour in May provided real-world examples of how almond growers are taking sustainable farming principles and putting them into action.
(Issue: July 2012)
The California Almond Sustainability Program (CASP) may now be accessed online by almond growers who would prefer to fill in workbooks at a place and time of their choosing.
(Issue: June 2012)
More than 10% of the state’s almond growers have participated in a California Almond Sustainability Program (CASP) workshop.
(Issue: March 2012)
In January, ABC began partnering with handlers in an effort to encourage growers to attend a sustainability program to complete at least one self-assessment module.
(Issue: January 2012)
The California Almond Sustainability Program needs you to participate in a self-assessment workshop.
(Issue: January 2012)
Two of the world’s largest food-and-beverage companies told Almond Conference attendees that consumers care about sustainability and want the products they buy to come from companies that share their concern for the future.
(Issue: December 2011)
The final workshop of 2011 for the California Almond Sustainability Program (CASP) will be held Dec. 6 in Modesto, just prior to the Opening Reception of The Almond Conference.
(Issue: December 2011)
When Greg Wegis fires up his iPad from the conference room of Wegis & Young, he has more than 2,000 acres of almonds in the southern San Joaquin Valley at his fingertips.
(Issue: November 2011)
The Almond Board of California has set forth an ambitious goal in 2012 to triple participation in the California Almond Sustainability Program to 600 growers through workshop attendance and completion of the five sustainability modules.
(Issue: October 2011)
The California Almond Sustainability Program (CASP) has set forth an ambitious goal for 2012 to triple grower participation in the program to 600 through workshop attendance and completion of the five sustainability modules.
(Issue: September 2011)
The State Water Board is facing pressure to mandate that agricultural groups prove they are using water resources in a way that is “beneficial and reasonable.” The Almond Board held a workshop in July to listen to different perspectives on regulating water use. History shows that regulation is more likely in the absence of data.
(Issue: August 2011)
The Almond Board of California Sustainability Program is gathering steam as a blitz of workshops in June and July added valuable data to bolster California Almonds’ standing in the eyes of buyers and sharpened growers’ understanding of how the program works and what constitutes a sustainable practice.
(Issue: July 2011)
Sustainability and organic almond production are sometimes confused, according to a recent survey of almond growers. But while they are occasionally interchanged, the terms organic and sustainable are not the same.
(Issue: July 2011)
The Almond Board's Environmental Stewardship Tour in May illustrated to regulators, public policy makers and the media how California Almond growers have shifted production practices over time to address environmental issues while improving profitability.
(Issue: June 2011)
Recently, the Washington Post devoted six pages of its Food section to a report on the conference “The Future of Food,” held in Washington, D.C., in May. Citing speakers that included Prince Charles of Wales, Wendell Berry, Eric Schlosser and Marion Nestle, the articles suggested fundamental change is needed in how food is grown and processed, claiming that the current system is hurtful to the environment and to people.
(Issue: May 2011)
Growers attending the Almond Board’s California Almond Sustainability Program (CASP) workshops this spring said that participating in sustainability modules not only confirmed that they are already implementing many sustainable practices in the orchard, but also helped trigger ideas about what they could do to improve their growing operations.
(Issue: April 2011)
With the addition of the newly developed Pest Management Module, the California Almond Sustainability Program now covers five areas of sustainable almond production: Irrigation, Nutrient Management, Air Quality, Energy Efficiency and Pest Management.
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