Change Site
Growers
Go Search
cancel
cancel
Thank you for signing up for eNews and/or creating an Almond Profile.
Your sign-up is complete.


 Categories



Recent Issues
[+]  July 2014
[+]  June 2014
[+]  May 2014
[+]  April 2014
[+]  March 2014
[+]  February 2014
[+]  January 2014
[+]  December 2013
[+]  November 2013
[+]  October 2013
[+]  August 2013
[+]  July 2013
[+]  June 2013
[+]  May 2013
[+]  April 2013
[+]  March 2013
[+]  February 2013
[+]  January 2013
[+]  December 2012
[+]  November 2012
[+]  October 2012
[+]  August 2012
[+]  July 2012
[+]  June 2012
[+]  May 2012
[+]  April 2012
[+]  March 2012
[+]  February 2012
[+]  January 2012
[+]  December 2011
[+]  November 2011
[+]  October 2011
[+]  August 2011
Past Issues
Search:

Orchard Management
(Issue: July 2014)
Understanding the biological processes by which almond trees make fruiting and vegetative selections is critical to managing water in a drought year.
(Issue: July 2014)
While the current drought has caused growers to pay closer attention to irrigation practices, results from the California Almond Sustainability Program (CASP) reveal how California Almond growers have increased water-use efficiency through equipment and technology, and are coping with tight water supplies.
(Issue: July 2014)
USDA has announced an $8 million addition to the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) to be awarded to growers in five Midwestern states who establish new habitats for honey bees.
(Issue: July 2014)
The California Department of Pesticide Regulation (DPR) and U.S. EPA are investigating losses of adult and immature bees rented for almond pollination that were observed and reported this spring.
(Issue: June 2014)
Fresno State Center for Irrigation Technology is offering a workshop on deficit irrigation technique using soil moisture sensors and real-time crop evapotranspiration (ETc). The program also includes a report on a three-year soil moisture sensor trial and a discussion of irrigation system performance.
(Issue: June 2014)
This week, listen to pomology consultant, Wes Asai, as he discusses different methods of pest management during the recent Almond Environmental Stewardship tour.
(Issue: June 2014)
The Natural Resources Conservation Service’s (NRCS) Environmental Quality Initiatives Program (EQIP) has created the California Air Quality Chipping Initiative to help San Joaquin Valley growers chip and incorporate or haul off woody debris from orchards removed due to drought.
(Issue: June 2014)
2014 is one of California’s driest years on record, creating challenging conditions for operation of the state and federal projects that move water across the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta.
(Issue: June 2014)
In this series on coping with drought, the Almond Board has been providing information and tools largely resulting from Almond Board–funded research to help growers cope with tight water supplies.
(Issue: June 2014)
The Almond Board of California had an active presence at four major events related to honey bee health this past April, reflecting increased interest by consumers and regulators in the decline of honey bees, monarch butterflies and other wild pollinator populations.
(Issue: May 2014)
The annual Southern San Joaquin Valley Almond Symposium will be held this year on May 29 at the Kerman Community Center.
(Issue: May 2014)
The Almond Board’s Gabriele Ludwig and Bob Curtis attended a national summit on the Varroa mite in February that assembled leading researchers and experts on Varroa mite and honey bee health. The summit focused on Varroa mite biology; breeding Varroa resistance in bees; the impact of honey bee nutrition on tolerance to Varroa mite and diseases associated with Varroa; mite control options and miticide resistance management; and outreach efforts for current and new Varroa mite tools and management.
(Issue: May 2014)
The first report of the California Almond Sustainability Program, released in 2013, shows that while the vast majority of almond growers employ technology and practices to significantly improve irrigation efficiency, fewer than half are using crop evapotranspiration (ETc) as a calculation for scheduling irrigations.
(Issue: May 2014)
A plant-based strategy for managed deficit irrigation (MDI), also known as regulated deficit irrigation, or RDI, targeting stress levels at specific crop stages can effectively manage hull rot and potentially reduce water use without impacting crop productivity.
(Issue: May 2014)
While replanting may not be currently on your mind, it is worth taking time now to start assessing whether you might need to fumigate your soils if you plan to replant in the next year or two.
(Issue: May 2014)
The University of California, Agriculture and Natural Resources (ANR), recently posted an additional resource online for Using the Pressure Chamber for Irrigation Management in Almonds.
(Issue: May 2014)
Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District are holding a joint workshop on the effects of the drought on Stanislaus County agriculture, how to implement effective deficit irrigation strategies, and what technical and financial assistance opportunities are available.
(Issue: May 2014)
The State Board of Food and Agriculture met recently to hear an update on pollinator issues related to farming and the environment. The meeting brought together academics, agricultural representatives, beekeepers and environmental stakeholders to discuss the current status of pollinators.
(Issue: April 2014)
Staying current on the latest California Almonds news and tips is easy with the Almond Update every Thursday on AgNet/West, sponsored by the Almond Board of California. Tune in to your local AgNet/West station each week, look for the Almond Update logo on the AgNet/West website or search under specialty crop news to learn more about the latest in the almond industry.
(Issue: April 2014)
The Almond Sustainability Report released at last year’s Almond Conference reveals that nutrient and irrigation management efficiencies have a significant impact on air quality and energy in addition to nutrient management and water quality and supply.
(Issue: April 2014)
Timing and system maintenance improve application accuracy, save water.
(Issue: April 2014)
During this time of unprecedented drought, the Almond Board has been providing information and tools to help growers cope with tight water supplies. This effort was kicked off at The Almond Conference last December with a workshop on irrigation strategies for drought management.
(Issue: March 2014)
Staying current on the latest California Almonds news and tips is easy with the Almond Update every Thursday on AgNet/West, sponsored by the Almond Board of California.
(Issue: March 2014)
Participating in an online survey on pollination management will not only help improve outreach, Extension and research on pollination management for California Almonds, it will also give you a chance to win an iPad.
(Issue: March 2014)
Last week, University of California farm advisor for San Joaquin county, Brent Holtz, covered common post-bloom disease issues facing California almond growers.
(Issue: March 2014)
A one-day industry/grower compost symposium is being offered by Cal Poly-San Luis Obispo on Mar. 28.
(Issue: March 2014)
Growers in the San Joaquin Valley planning to use high VOC (volatile organic compound) formulations of the pesticides that contain chlorpyrifos (Lorsban), abamectin (Agri-Mek) or oxyfluorfen (Goal) must first get a written recommendation from their pest control adviser that the high VOC formulation is needed before material is purchased.
(Issue: March 2014)
Spring is a critical time to monitor and control overwintering leaffooted bugs that are moving into and feeding on developing almond nuts, resulting in crop losses from fruit drop.
(Issue: March 2014)
California Almond growers, PCAs and handlers who ship to export markets must constantly be aware of the maximum pesticide residue levels allowed by each market. A workshop to provide a practical overview of maximum residue levels (MRLs) science and policy issues is being offered to help attendees understand the evolving regulatory requirements of our global trading partners.
(Issue: February 2014)
Staying current on the latest California Almonds news and tips is easy with the Almond Update every Thursday on AgNet/West, sponsored by the Almond Board of California.
(Issue: February 2014)
The California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) and USDA will be holding informational sessions on drought resources for farmers, ranchers and farmworkers in the coming weeks. The government programs are designed to assist farmers with water conservation, crop insurance and other on-farm management tools.
(Issue: February 2014)
U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced on Feb. 4 that USDA will make $20 million available for water conservation efforts throughout California to combat the effects of the drought. Secretary Vilsack made the announcement during a joint press conference with CDFA Secretary Karen Ross and Congressman Jim Costa, D-16.
(Issue: February 2014)
By now, everyone is aware that Gov. Brown proclaimed a state of emergency on Jan. 17 due to continued dry weather and water shortfalls. In his proclamation, the Governor called for all Californians to take voluntary actions to reduce their water usage by 20%, and he provided state agencies with more flexibility in managing water supplies throughout the state.
(Issue: February 2014)
Irrigation management for almonds under severe drought conditions will be addressed at upcoming University of California Cooperative Extension meetings.
(Issue: February 2014)
Staying current on the latest California Almonds news and tips is easy with the Almond Update every Thursday on AgNet/West, sponsored by the Almond Board of California.
(Issue: February 2014)
California is in its third year of drought with no relief in sight, and not enough time left in the rainy season to make up for shortages.
(Issue: February 2014)
Confirmed band canker infections are on the rise in California Almonds in recent years and can be particularly damaging to 1- to 5-year-old trees. While there is no known chemical cure, growers can take steps to protect young trees from infection through cultural practices.
(Issue: January 2014)
The new requirement for reporting nitrogen fertilizer applications to cropland has been delayed one year, a result of developments stemming from a report to the legislature about nitrate contamination in groundwater, the Coalition for Urban/Rural Environmental Stewardship (CURES) reports in its current newsletter.
(Issue: January 2014)
Staying current on the latest California Almonds news and tips is easy with the Almond Update every Thursday on AgNet/West, sponsored by the Almond Board of California.
(Issue: January 2014)
With some rainfall (and snow in the mountains) in November and December, the water availability picture may brighten somewhat, but as Dr. Ken Shackel, UC Davis, said at an Almond Conference workshop on Irrigation Strategies for Drought Management, “No one has to be told we’re having a drought — it’s serious.”
(Issue: January 2014)
As bloom season approaches, growers should remember to use caution when applying bloom-time sprays and consider their potential impact on bees.
(Issue: December 2013)
How to best manage irrigation in a potentially short water year is a complex question for almond growers.
(Issue: December 2013)
It’s not all up to beekeepers; almond growers can also be active participants in improving pollination of their crops.
(Issue: November 2013)
An in-depth explanation of the role nutrition and vascular tissue play in developing almond fruit wood is being offered in a free webinar, “Optimization of Almond Fruitwood Development Through Nutrition & Vascular Means.”
(Issue: November 2013)
Bob Curtis, the Almond Board’s associate director, Agricultural Affairs, was awarded the UC Davis College of Agricultural and Environmental Science (CA&ES) Award of Distinction.
(Issue: November 2013)
Nov. 15 is the deadline to participate in the latest round of funding for a voluntary conservation program popular with almond growers.
(Issue: November 2013)
The potential impacts of drought conditions next year on the state’s water supply and agriculture were the focus of a special Sept. 10 joint meeting of the California Water Commission and the California Board of Food and Agriculture.
(Issue: November 2013)
Fall is the time of year that beekeepers are busy preparing their hives for almond pollination. This is a critical time for beekeepers to maintain bee strength and build young colonies for almond pollination in early February.
(Issue: September 2013)
Listen to Bob Curtis, associate director, Agricultural Affairs, as he discusses best management practices to protect honey bee health and safety, from establishing good communication with the beekeeper to planting forage as a supplement to the bees’ diet.
(Issue: September 2013)
Recent media reports about problems with honey bee health invariably mention almonds as the crop most dependent on honey bees in the United States.
(Issue: August 2013)
The honey bee supply is being affected by a wide range of factors, including colony collapse disorder and related stressors such as Varroa mites, lack of pollen and nectar food sources, pesticides and pathogens.
(Issue: July 2013)
When water is in tight supply, improving irrigation efficiency will help protect the health of your trees and crop.
(Issue: July 2013)
Orchard management activities continue after harvest to protect the crop from contamination and loss of quality.
(Issue: June 2013)
At an Almond Field Day coming up in Visalia, you'll learn about alternate bearing and the importance of postharvest nutrition.
(Issue: June 2013)
Gurreet Brar is the new farm advisor for nut crops in Fresno and Madera Counties. He comes to UC Cooperative Extension from University of Florida, where he was a graduate research assistant for four years conducting horticultural research in plant propagation and plant physiology.
(Issue: June 2013)
The Southern San Joaquin Valley Almond Symposium, presented by UC Cooperative Extension, will be held Wednesday, June 12, from 7:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Kerman Community Center.
(Issue: June 2013)
The Almond Board of California (ABC) Production Research Committee consists of seven members, plus alternates, who represent a broad spectrum of almond industry members.
(Issue: June 2013)
As we complete this year’s research budgeting cycle, I have been reflecting on the critical issues facing almond growers, and the role of the research program sponsored by the Almond Board of California in meeting these formidable challenges.
(Issue: June 2013)
This year marks the 40th anniversary of the Almond Board of California’s (ABC’s) Production Research Program, and improvements in yield and quality over the past 40 years are no coincidence.
(Issue: May 2013)
Recently, both The New York Times and newsman Dan Rather reported prominently on the situation with overwintering honey bee losses.
(Issue: May 2013)
A proactive, year-round strategy is the best approach for managing ground squirrels in almond orchards.
(Issue: May 2013)
Now is the time to plan ahead for pest management activities leading up to and during hullsplit. The three key areas to consider at this time are hull rot, hullsplit sprays for navel orangeworm, and sprayer calibration and coverage.
(Issue: May 2013)
According to the new almond fertility protocol that is revolutionizing the way almond growers apply nitrogen fertilizers throughout the year, May is the time to make in-season adjustments to nitrogen budgets on the basis of April sampling results and adjusted yield predictions.
(Issue: May 2013)
If you’ve been following the new Almond Early-Season Sampling and In-Season Nitrogen Application protocol provided on the Almond Board website, please note that revisions have been made.
(Issue: April 2013)
UC IPM has just published an online video to help almond growers manage pests using the year-round IPM program.
(Issue: April 2013)
An effective navel orangeworm (NOW) pheromone formulation is now commercially available in a lure to be placed in traps for field monitoring.
(Issue: April 2013)
If you are adapting your fertility program to follow the early-sampling and in-season nitrogen application program, remember to sample leaf tissue in April, approximately 43 days (plus-or-minus six days) after full bloom.
(Issue: April 2013)
As almond trees have shed their blooms and trees are leafing out, it’s time for growers to turn their attention to one of the most vexing orchard problems: pocket gophers.
(Issue: April 2013)
Lack of alternative forage is often cited as one of the causes of decline in honey bee health.
(Issue: March 2013)

The traditional practice of sampling almond leaves in July in order to determine fertilizer rates and timing is too late to allow for in-season adjustments that match the crops’ needs.

(Issue: March 2013)

Researchers have now confirmed that six glyphosate-resistant weed species have been identified in California.

(Issue: March 2013)

Research findings presented at last year’s Almond Conference provided growers with information and insights for refining their spring pest management programs.

(Issue: February 2013)
Almond growers who plan to apply insecticides during bloom should carefully consider this approach. New information and data suggest some insecticides may impact honey bee brood (developing larvae) and alternative timing and choice of insecticides should be considered.
(Issue: February 2013)

Almond growers who regularly make their first nitrogen applications in February should wait at least a month until leaf-out occurs, according to findings coming out of major research on almond nutrient management funded by the Almond Board and USDA.

(Issue: February 2013)

UCCE agronomy crop advisor Shannon Mueller has developed an online education and training program for assessing the strength of honey bees and colonies.

(Issue: February 2013)

A number of excellent fungicide treatments have been registered to protect against brown rot, shot hole, gray mold and jacket/green fruit rot, according to UC plant pathologist Jim Adaskaveg, who spoke at the 2012 Almond Conference in December.

(Issue: January 2013)
A recent trend has been to reduce honey bee colony density for pollination down below the standard practice of two per acre.
(Issue: January 2013)
New research is putting California Almonds at the forefront of perennial crop nutrient management, just as growers anticipate new nitrogen management programs to be required under the revised Irrigated Lands Regulatory Program.
(Issue: January 2013)
Under the new Irrigated Lands Regulatory Program, California growers will soon be required to develop a nutrient management plan to reduce the potential for nitrogen to leach into the groundwater.
(Issue: December 2012)
Winter sanitation is critical to reduce overwintering populations of navel orangeworm (NOW) and the potential for damage and aflatoxin contamination in next year’s crop.
(Issue: December 2012)
The University of California Cooperative Extension (UCCE) fruit-and-nut advisors, specialists and University of California, Davis (UCD) Plant Sciences faculty will present a two-week course from Feb. 25 through March 7, 2013, at the UC Davis Conference Center.
(Issue: October 2012)
The Almond Board continues to follow the changing landscape for international pesticide maximum residue levels (MRLs) and provide resources for growers, PCAs and handlers as they plan pest management strategies on almonds destined for key export markets.
(Issue: October 2012)
Ongoing research by UCCE farm advisor Roger Duncan in Stanislaus County confirms past research in almond-growing regions throughout California.
(Issue: October 2012)
Project Apis m. (PAm) is looking for almond cooperators this fall to further demonstrate the potential for bee forage in almond orchards as a pre- or postbloom food resource.
(Issue: September 2012)
Improving the accuracy and efficacy of spray application not only provides improved pest control and ultimately better returns to growers, but it can also reduce environmental impacts by minimizing off-site movement of pesticides.
(Issue: August 2012)
California growers face significant scrutiny for their contribution over the years to nitrates in groundwater.
(Issue: June 2012)
The latest Almond Board–funded research led by Patrick Brown offers an updated in-season nutrient budget model that will help growers make management decisions that hit the Four R’s.
(Issue: May 2012)
Past and current ABC-funded research illustrates that effective hull rot management takes an integrated approach that includes regulated deficit irrigation at hullsplit, and a balanced fertility program that does not apply nitrogen in excess of tree and crop demands.
(Issue: May 2012)
Research funded by the Almond Board dating back to 2004 indicates lower-limb dieback (LLD) is a syndrome or physiological disorder primarily induced by excessively wet soils early in the season.
(Issue: April 2012)
The University of California has developed a tool for estimating hullsplit based on bloom date, weather data and phenology modeling.
(Issue: April 2012)
As an industry, we have made significant advances in the last 20 years in nitrogen management.
(Issue: April 2012)
A draft UC Davis report on nitrates in groundwater released March 13 may lead to higher costs and new regulations on nitrogen fertilizers.
(Issue: March 2012)
A long career dedicated to working closely with growers to develop and deliver practical and relevant pest management programs will come to an end for Walt Bentley when he retires this summer.
(Issue: March 2012)
UC IPM entomologist Walt Bentley said integrated pest management (IPM) will be a key to continued boosts in productivity while maintaining crop quality.
(Issue: February 2012)
Shifting crop patterns in the Midwest are challenging beekeepers’ ability to provide a healthy year-round foraging diet for managed honey bees to pollinate California’s 750,000 acres of almonds.
(Issue: February 2012)
Over the next few months, Western Farm Press magazine will publish a three-part series of articles on nitrogen management in almonds to help almond growers better understand pending regulatory issues and put together an efficient nitrogen fertilizer management program.
(Issue: February 2012)
There is still no smoking gun pinpointing the cause of colony collapse disorder (CCD) among the nation’s honey bees, reported Chris Heintz at The Almond Conference in December.
(Issue: January 2012)
Three veteran almond farm advisors shared their thoughts at this year’s Almond Conference on growing a 2-billion-pound crop, outlining the advances in production practices that helped almond growers get there, and the challenges growers face in producing even larger crops in the future.
(Issue: November 2011)
Selecting varieties is a complicated task. There is no perfect choice, yet the decision is one that growers must live with for a long time. At the 2009 Almond Industry Conference, a panel of experts gave growers assistance in this choice by reviewing variety development, evaluation and selection, while balancing both field and market considerations. This second article looks at the “checklist” of issues to consider when choosing almond varieties in terms of bloom, pollination and harvest timing.
(Issue: November 2011)
Persistent spring rains the last couple of seasons have brought an increase in late-spring and summer diseases, such as scab, rust and Alternaria leaf spot. These are associated with orchards with dense canopies in combination with micro-sprinkler irrigation.
(Issue: October 2011)
Selecting varieties is a complicated task — there is no perfect choice, yet the decision is one that growers must live with for a long time. At the 2009 Almond Industry Conference, a panel of experts gave growers assistance in this choice by reviewing variety development, evaluation and selection, balancing both field and market considerations.
(Issue: June 2011)
Soil fumigation is often a major investment when replanting an almond orchard. It is important to first identify whether fumigation is necessary by assessing soil samples and orchard history. Based on that assessment, a grower or PCA can determine whether to fumigate and which compound(s) work best for the specific situation.
(Issue: June 2011)
Good orchard floor management prior to harvest can help harvest run more smoothly and reduce food safety risks from microbial contamination, according to Farm Advisor Joe Connell.
(Issue: May 2011)
Among the earliest and most important decisions a grower will make when replanting an almond orchard is the selection of rootstocks and compatible varieties.
(Issue: April 2011)
Almond growers have several issues to consider before replanting an orchard.
Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01
Warning: This link connects to a third party website not associated with the Almond Board of California. The link has been provided solely as a convenience to you and The Almond Board of California assumes no responsibility for the accuracy, quality, safety, or nature of the content on the linked site.
Click Agree to continue to the requested site, or click Decline to return to your most recently viewed Almond Board page.
agree decline