Change Site
Growers
Go Search
cancel
cancel
Thank you for signing up for eNews and/or creating an Almond Profile.
Your sign-up is complete.


 Categories



Recent Issues
[+]  July 2014
[+]  June 2014
[+]  May 2014
[+]  April 2014
[+]  March 2014
[+]  February 2014
[+]  January 2014
[+]  December 2013
[+]  November 2013
[+]  October 2013
[+]  August 2013
[+]  July 2013
[+]  June 2013
[+]  May 2013
[+]  April 2013
[+]  March 2013
[+]  February 2013
[+]  January 2013
[+]  December 2012
[+]  November 2012
[+]  October 2012
[+]  August 2012
[+]  July 2012
[+]  June 2012
[+]  May 2012
[+]  April 2012
[+]  March 2012
[+]  February 2012
[+]  January 2012
[+]  December 2011
[+]  November 2011
[+]  October 2011
[+]  August 2011
Past Issues
Search:

Laws and Regulations
(Issue: July 2014)
The California Almond objective forecast for the 2014–2015 crop year was announced today at the office of the Almond Board of California (ABC). Based on 860,000 bearing acres, the California Almond objective forecast for the 2014–2015 crop is 2.10 billion meat pounds.
(Issue: July 2014)
The California State Board of Food and Agriculture met recently to discuss groundwater sustainability. With California enduring its third consecutive year of drought, groundwater has become the last line of defense for agriculture.
(Issue: June 2014)
In August 2013, the Almond Board of California (ABC) entered into an agreement with the Almond Hullers and Processors Association (AHPA) to provide the almond industry with a greater voice in issues relevant to the industry.
(Issue: June 2014)
The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) released the final 2012 Census of Agriculture results on May 2. The report contains a wide range of information about what agricultural products were raised in the United States in 2012, and where, how and by whom they were grown.
(Issue: June 2014)
Have questions about the new farm bill? Four USDA agencies will be present at workshops June 24 and 25 to answer questions about changes in such programs as conservation, commodities, crop insurance, rural development, loans, disasters, energy opportunities and more.
(Issue: May 2014)
The U.S. EPA announced in February proposed revisions to its Worker Protection Standards that would include, among other proposals, additional signage and training requirements and “no-entry” buffer zones around pesticide-treated fields.
(Issue: May 2014)
In March, Governor Jerry Brown signed into law a $687 million plan to assist drought-stricken communities throughout California. The new law includes money for housing and food for workers directly affected by the drought, bond funds for local communities to more efficiently capture and manage water, and funding for securing emergency drinking water supplies for drought-impacted communities.
(Issue: May 2014)
Several bills have been introduced in the House and Senate to address the ongoing California drought. California Senators Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer introduced a bill in February that would provide congressional direction to federal agencies responsible for implementing federal regulations affecting operations of the Central Valley Project and the State Water Project for the duration of the drought emergency declared by Governor Jerry Brown.
(Issue: April 2014)
The Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee of the California State Assembly will hold an oversight hearing in Modesto on the need, from a local perspective, for a 2014 water bond.
(Issue: April 2014)
There are several water bonds being considered by the California Legislature, and one key factor being considered in all of them is a provision for infrastructure development, including new storage. Other critical provisions include drinking water quality, water supply for disadvantaged communities, Delta environmental sustainability projects and regional water management projects and strategies.
(Issue: March 2014)
The State Water Resources Control Board is expected to approve a request from the East San Joaquin Water Quality Coalition (ESJ) to postpone the deadline for growers in high-vulnerability areas within the Coalition to file a Farm Evaluation Plan until May 1, 2014.
(Issue: March 2014)
Growers in the San Joaquin Valley currently operating Tier 1 diesel pump motors have until the end of this year to replace those engines with cleaner burning Tier 4 motors under state ozone regulations designed to reduce PM 2.5 and NOx emissions.
(Issue: March 2014)
California Almond growers, PCAs and handlers who ship to export markets must constantly be aware of the maximum pesticide residue levels allowed by each market. A workshop to provide a practical overview of maximum residue levels (MRLs) science and policy issues is being offered to help attendees understand the evolving regulatory requirements of our global trading partners.
(Issue: March 2014)
In a show of confidence in the Almond Board of California, the state’s almond growers once again voted overwhelmingly in favor of continuing the Federal Marketing Order for California Almonds. Federal Marketing Order 981 requires the continuance referendum to take place every five years.
(Issue: February 2014)
It’s been five years since growers overwhelmingly voted in favor of continuing the Federal Marketing Order for California Almonds, and growers will vote again in a continuance referendum that will take place from Feb. 18 through Mar. 7.
(Issue: February 2014)
Ballots and instructions have been mailed to independent growers and handlers whose names are on file with the Almond Board of California (ABC) to select one independent grower member and alternate position and two independent handler member and alternate positions to serve as directors for ABC during the 2014–2015 crop year.
(Issue: January 2014)
It’s been five years since growers overwhelmingly voted in favor of continuing the Federal marketing order for California Almonds, and growers will vote again in a continuance referendum that will take place from Feb. 18 through March 7.
(Issue: January 2014)
The impact of the landmark UC Davis study on nitrate in drinking water, released in March 2012, is being felt throughout California agriculture as state legislators debate legislation addressing safe drinking water issues raised in the report.
(Issue: December 2013)
The comment period is over for the proposed Food Safety Modernization Act.
(Issue: December 2013)
A joint oversight hearing was held to discuss the threat to California agriculture from the widespread loss of honey bees.
(Issue: December 2013)
New watershed-specific coalitions have been formed for growers in the Tulare Lake Basin south of the San Joaquin River to Kern County who have not already signed up with a coalition
(Issue: November 2013)
Staff from the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District will be visiting agricultural operations holding district permits for vapor recovery systems for aboveground gasoline storage tanks.
(Issue: October 2013)
The Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board in September approved Waste Discharge Requirements (WDR) for 2.5 million acres of farmland in the Tulare Lake Basin area in Fresno, Tulare, Kings and Kern counties.
(Issue: October 2013)
Water remains the lifeblood of California’s almond industry, and because California water policy is incredibly complex, driven by intense competition among very diverse interests, the Almond Board of California has stepped up its efforts to bring clarity to water issues of interest to growers and handlers.
(Issue: September 2013)
In July, industry members and ABC staff were in Washington, D.C., for a weeklong series of meetings to update government agencies and industry alliances on almond production and market development issues.
(Issue: September 2013)
The 2013 National Resources Inventory Conservation Effects Assessment Project (NRI-CEAP) will kick off in October
(Issue: August 2013)
The Irrigated Lands Regulatory Program (ILRP) has undergone an important shift in how it regulates almond growers, with the program expanding to include groundwater protection.
(Issue: August 2013)
State and federal regulators who create rules related to water and air quality, endangered species, and pesticide and fertilizer use attended the Almond Board’s ninth annual Environmental Stewardship Tour in May.
(Issue: August 2013)
USDA is hosting a webinar titled “FDA’s Proposed Produce Safety Rules – An Interactive Discussion” from 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon Pacific Time on Wednesday, Aug. 28.
(Issue: July 2013)
There has been much legislative activity in Washington that is relevant to the California Almond industry.
(Issue: June 2013)
As environmental regulatory issues have evolved and become more complex, research funded by the Almond Board’s Environmental Committee has also evolved over the last decade.
(Issue: June 2013)
The California Dept. of Pesticide Regulation has proposed new regulations on the use of chloropicrin (Pic) to reduce potential worker and bystander exposure that could impact almond growers in the future who fumigate soil at replant with a Pic-containing product, such as Telone C35.
(Issue: May 2013)
In response to numerous requests to extend the comment period for the FSMA proposed rules, FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg has announced that FDA intends to extend the comment period by another 120 days.
(Issue: May 2013)
Assembly member Toni Atkins recently visited a local almond orchard and processing facility to learn about the almond industry, at the invitation of AHPA, the Ag Council of California and the Almond Board.
(Issue: April 2013)
The 2012 elections brought many new members on both the state and federal level to represent Californians. With almonds now the second largest California crop by value, it is important that industry members remain engaged with their local and national elected officials.
(Issue: April 2013)
The State Water Resources Control Board has released a report outlining 15 recommendations for addressing the issue of nitrates in groundwater.
(Issue: April 2013)
The proposed Produce Safety rule of the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) identifies potential routes of on-farm contamination, including water, equipment and manure, and will require more record keeping from growers when the rule is fully implemented.
(Issue: April 2013)
Agriculture leaders in both the House and Senate have made a commitment to passage of a new farm bill this year, after the 2008 farm bill was given a one-year extension as part of the fiscal cliff negotiations.
(Issue: April 2013)
The Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board will hold a workshop to discuss the Tulare Lake Basin area waste discharge requirements (WDRs) being developed for discharges from irrigated lands.
(Issue: April 2013)
The East San Joaquin Water Quality Coalition (ESJWQC) is co-hosting with local county Farm Bureaus three informational meetings on the new water quality regulations that apply to irrigated agriculture in the northern San Joaquin Valley.
(Issue: April 2013)
The State Water Resource Control Board’s proposal to send more water down the San Joaquin River to protect fish and wildlife will be on the agenda Wednesday, May 1, in Modesto when the Middle San Joaquin Watershed Stakeholder group meets.
(Issue: March 2013)
The California Air Resources Board has extended its time frame for developing new ag motor rules from one year to two years, and announced new rules will apply, at least initially, only to the San Joaquin Valley.
(Issue: March 2013)

The two new proposed food safety rules (Preventive Controls and Produce Safety) under the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) will change the way many in agriculture operate.

(Issue: March 2013)

With the California Almond industry facing the implementation of food safety regulations worldwide, we are reminded how important it is to be part of the regulatory process, here or in one of our 90+ export markets.

(Issue: March 2013)

In advance of Chinese New Year, packages of California Almonds began appearing in wholesale and retail markets across China with labels bearing a new name: Ba Dan Mu.

(Issue: March 2013)

After months of waiting, on Jan. 16, two new proposed food safety rules were published in the Federal Register.

(Issue: March 2013)

Hearings will be held March 21–22 on a proposal to require that 35% of the water from the Stanislaus, Merced and Tuolumne Rivers flows unimpeded through the system for the benefit of fish and wildlife from February through June each year.

(Issue: March 2013)

The San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District has submitted a revised State Implementation Plan (SIP) for improving air quality in the San Joaquin Valley to meet newer federal standards for PM 2.5 (fine particles) emissions.

(Issue: February 2013)

After a long wait, the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) is finally coming to life with the first two of five proposed rules published for comment — Preventive Controls for Human Food and Produce Safety.

(Issue: February 2013)

Growers within the East San Joaquin Water Quality Coalition (ESJWQC) will be expected to track their nitrogen use and efforts to protect both surface and ground water starting in 2014.

(Issue: January 2013)
From the orchard to the supermarket shelf, there are numerous regulatory challenges that the almond industry will face in the next year, both in the U.S. and around the world.
(Issue: January 2013)
Owners of agricultural trucks are reminded to record their odometer readings by Jan. 31, 2013, and report those to the California Air Resources Board (CARB) to maintain their agricultural exemption.
(Issue: December 2012)
Legislation that would have repealed the long-standing 10-hour daily overtime requirement for agricultural employees was rejected in the state Assembly in September.
(Issue: December 2012)
California received more than $18 million out of the total $55 million awarded nationwide by USDA for the Specialty Crop Block Grant Program that began Oct. 1.
(Issue: December 2012)
New federal labels that contain new rules for applying major soil fumigants, including methyl bromide, chloropicrin and metam sodium, are in effect as of Dec. 1.
(Issue: December 2012)
The proposed development of a high-speed train (HST) system in California is raising concerns among San Joaquin Valley growers.
(Issue: November 2012)
A dozen regional, state and federal air quality regulators attended the almond industry’s first Almond Harvest Tour, witnessing the three-step harvesting process first-hand and hearing directly from manufacturers and growers.
(Issue: November 2012)
The Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board will hold a meeting Nov. 30 near Bakersfield that will include discussions of the Eastern San Joaquin River watershed and Tulare Lake Basin waste discharge requirements being developed for discharges from irrigated lands.
(Issue: November 2012)
Gov. Brown has vetoed two pieces of legislation related to heat regulations for farm workers.
(Issue: November 2012)
Nov. 16 is the deadline for applying for Fiscal Year 2013 Farm Bill conservation program financial assistance from the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS).
(Issue: November 2012)
The State Air Resources Board (ARB) this fall held its first round of public workshops as it drafts rules to transition mobile agricultural equipment to cleaner-burning, lower-emission Tier 4 engines.
(Issue: November 2012)
Ryan Hanretty, legislative assistant to Rep. Jeff Denham, visited Central California in September to learn about the California Almond industry.
(Issue: October 2012)
Industry members and Almond Board staff were in Washington, D.C., recently to update government agencies and industry alliances on almond production and market development issues.
(Issue: October 2012)
The San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District has announced the next round of incentive funding to assist in the purchase of cleaner-burning farm equipment.
(Issue: September 2012)
The California Air Resources Board (ARB) is holding its first public workshops to discuss the development of the In-Use Self-Propelled Off-road Mobile Agricultural Equipment Regulation (mobile ag regulation).
(Issue: August 2012)
ABC’s Gabriele Ludwig, Bryce Spycher and Caroline Stringer attended the seventh annual MRL (maximum residue limits) workshop in San Francisco in June.
(Issue: August 2012)
Gov. Jerry Brown has annouced the appointment of Felicia Marcus and Steve Moore to the State Water Resources Control Board.
(Issue: July 2012)
The Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board is working with individual water quality coalitions to develop regionally specific regulations for an expanded Irrigated Lands Program.
(Issue: July 2012)
The State Water Resources Control Board held a hearing in May to gather public input on measures it will recommend to the state Legislature to reduce nitrates and nitrate loading in groundwater.
(Issue: June 2012)
In late April, food safety regulators from the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) economies and private industry groups met outside of Washington, D.C., to discuss export certification.
(Issue: June 2012)
Regulators and elected officials got a firsthand look at innovative almond growing practices at the Almond Board of California’s Environmental Stewardship Tour on May 11.
(Issue: May 2012)
The Almond Board’s Bob Curtis was recently invited by the California State Board of Food and Agriculture to give a presentation on nitrogen management in almonds.
(Issue: May 2012)
In March, the Almond Board cooperated with FDA and USDA in hosting officials from Japan’s Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW).
(Issue: May 2012)
A public workshop to gather comments on possible solutions to the nitrate groundwater contamination issue and how to fund those solutions will be held on May 23 in Sacramento.
(Issue: May 2012)
California farmers are among the most regulated in the U.S., and keeping abreast of various environmental regulations is a big task for growers.
(Issue: May 2012)
The manufacturer of Midas (methyl iodide), the embattled soil fumigant registered for use in California crops in December 2010 as a potential replacement for methyl bromide, has suspended the sale of all formulations of the product in the U.S. due to market conditions.
(Issue: April 2012)
Almond conversations from the social media realm.
(Issue: April 2012)
United States Trade Representative Ron Kirk announced in late February that the U.S.-Korea Free Trade Agreement would enter into force — that is, take effect — on March 15, 2012.
(Issue: March 2012)
In January, President Obama petitioned Congress to reduce the size of the federal government by merging six trade-related federal agencies.
(Issue: March 2012)
The California Department of Pesticide Regulation (DPR) is revising its regulations on volatile organic compound (VOC)-emitting pesticides, which could change the crop protection decisions almond growers make in the 2013 crop season.
(Issue: February 2012)
Almond growers will continue to face an ongoing struggle over water supplies appropriated through the Delta, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) relicensing processes, groundwater management regulation and the San Joaquin River settlement.
(Issue: January 2012)
Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from pesticide applications increased in several critical air quality regions in 2010 after two years of decline.
(Issue: January 2012)
With more than 1.1 billion pounds of almonds shipped to over 90 countries last year, and a record crop expected this year, it is important to keep in mind that pesticide tolerances (maximum residue levels, or MRLs) often differ from one market to another.
(Issue: December 2011)
Federal and state budget cuts are already affecting the California Almond industry, and more cuts lie ahead.
(Issue: November 2011)
The State Water Resources Control Board voted in September to increase fees by $27.6 million for all water quality permit holders in California. The fee increases are intended to fill gaps in the state budget by shifting the cost for regulatory programs, such as the Irrigated Lands Regulatory Program (ILRP), from taxpayers to permit fee payers.
(Issue: July 2011)
Groundwater regulations for Central Valley agriculture came one step closer to reality on June 9, when the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board approved a two-year extension for the existing Irrigated Lands Regulatory Program. The extension gives state regulators and watershed coalitions time to write their new “General Orders,” which will contain region-specific requirements to address both surface- and groundwater quality.
Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01 Image 01
Warning: This link connects to a third party website not associated with the Almond Board of California. The link has been provided solely as a convenience to you and The Almond Board of California assumes no responsibility for the accuracy, quality, safety, or nature of the content on the linked site.
Click Agree to continue to the requested site, or click Decline to return to your most recently viewed Almond Board page.
agree decline